Using your anxiety to your advantage

Anxiety, as both a condition and a feeling, is characterized as an incomprehensible dread. These intense feelings of worry and sense of vulnerability can be passing or seemingly constant. While uncomfortable, these feelings aren’t always harmful.

Drug and/or alcohol abuse can cause neurological changes that can trigger or intensify anxiety. When these feelings impede on your day to day activities, cause family, work or social difficulties, or illicit an extreme physical response, they can be classified as a disorder, and should be managed with the help of a qualified professional.

However, the regular, everyday anxieties – sometimes the ones that come along on the path of recovering from addiction – can be channeled to benefit to you.

Anxiety is a crucial element for the fight or flight response system. These feelings of worry and dread are intended to keep you safe, inciting warning or increasing focus.When these feelings of dread set in, take a moment of reflection. What are you feeling anxious about? Is it an average task, or is it a bigger conflict?

First, try changing your mindset.

For example, if you are feeling anxious about a job interview, focus on being excited for new opportunities rather than nervous about failing.Then, let anxiety serve as motivation for preparedness for these situations. Look to rehearsal, practice, or studying to help you combat these feelings, as you learn or practice you will have less to fear.

Further experiment with relaxation techniques, like meditation or mindfulness, to help calm your nerves. Anxiety will be a part of life, and recovery, but you can turn it into a powerful tool.

 

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